GROWTH MINDSETS- LESSON 2- 

REVIEWING THE FOUNDATION OF GROWTH MINDSET

DEBRIEF: “I HAVE NOT FAILED. I HAVE JUST FOUND 10,000 WAYS THAT WON’T WORK.” THOMAS EDISON. STUDENTS CAN THINK OF ONE MISTAKE THEY HAVE MADE THIS WEEK (AND WHAT IT TAUGHT THEM) AND SHARE IT WITH THEIR PARTNER. USE THIS SENTENCE STRUCTURE (MY FAVOURITE MISTAKE THIS WEEK IS………..BECAUSE I LEARNED……………)

DEBRIEF: “I HAVE NOT FAILED. I HAVE JUST FOUND 10,000 WAYS THAT WON’T WORK.” THOMAS EDISON. STUDENTS CAN THINK OF ONE MISTAKE THEY HAVE MADE THIS WEEK (AND WHAT IT TAUGHT THEM) AND SHARE IT WITH THEIR PARTNER. USE THIS SENTENCE STRUCTURE (MY FAVOURITE MISTAKE THIS WEEK IS………..BECAUSE I LEARNED……………)


PART 1- (5 MINUTES)

Rationale

  • Teaching students a growth mindset can help increase their motivation to learn, as well as lead to higher engagement and performance (Good, Aronson, & Inzlicht, 2003; Blackwell, Trzesniewski & Dweck, 2007; Aronson, Fried & Good, 2002).

 

Learning objectives

By the end of this lesson, learners should:

  • identify and understand two ways of thinking about intelligence
  • commit to an activity that will grow their neurons
  • explain how they can get their brain to develop

PART 2- watch clip- (5 MINUTES)

It all starts with the science of neuroplasticity. Watch this video.


 

PART 3- watch, record, discuss- (10-15 MINUTES)

As students watch, they should record in their workbook, AT LEAST:

- 1 new learning

- 1 learning that has been reinforced

- 1 question / challenge / argument you might hav.

Then teachers are to facilitate a class discussion about what has been recorded.


PART 4- watch, respond and share- (20 MINUTES)

What are two ways of thinking about intelligence, as explained in the clip? Is one view more correct than the other? Explain how your brain is like a muscle in your own words. How can you get your brain to develop like a muscle?

When students are finished responding in their workbook, they are to move into pairs or groups of three to share their responses. As students listen they should make at least one point (on a post-it note, or similar) about something new that they learned from someone else. This is then submitted to the teacher at the end of the lesson. Teachers may choose to invite three or four students to share their responses with the whole class.